Institutional Racism

The Dark lives of China’s “black children.”

I find it interesting that the Chinese refer to the disenfranchised people in their nation as “Black Children.” Find out more about “Black Children” here;

Li Xue was born in Beijing and has lived there all her life. But like millions of others conceived in violation of China’s one-child policy, as far as the state is concerned Li Xue does not exist.
She has no right to schooling, health care or a formal job. She has no birth certificate or identity papers, she is unable to join a public library, get legally married or even take a train.

“I was born here, but I don’t have any of the rights of a Chinese person,” she said. “Whatever I do, I’m blocked and have difficulties. There is nothing in China that proves whether I even exist or not,”

This is what makes Li Xue, a “black child,” an alien in her own country.

Li Xue, pictured with her sister Li BinShe (R) has no right to schooling, health care or a formal job because she does not have a birth certificate or identity papers -- a "black child", an alien in her own country (AFP Photo/Goh Chai Hin)

Li Xue, pictured with her sister Li BinShe (R) has no right to schooling, health care or a formal job because she does not have a birth certificate or identity papers — a “black child”, an alien in her own country (AFP Photo/Goh Chai Hin)

 

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